Monday, December 15, 2014

Eye Post #6: Night-Time Contacts When I Sleep?!

Welcome back to another eye post!

A friend asked me about what he heard as "night-time contacts": what they are, what they do, etc. Well, let me give you a tidbit about them.

Taken from orthokdoctors.com


Patients wear contacts only at night when they sleep for a process called orthokeratology, also known as corneal reshaping. The contact lenses help reshape the surface of the cornea in a way to help reduce myopia (nearsightedness), although research has enabled this process for hyperopic (farsightedness) and presbyopic correction. After a night or two wearing them, your vision would be clear enough that glasses won't be needed during the day! When your vision becomes blurry again, then you'll need to have them on at night again. That's why people undergoing this procedure tend to wear them every night when they sleep. Depending on your prescription, the maximum effect of the night-time contacts could be seen in 1-2 days of wearing them in your sleep or a week if you have a higher prescription.

The best candidates for this procedure are those who have a mild prescription for myopia, but ultimately your optometrist would be the one who determines if you're good for the procedure or not. If you're interested in orthokeratology, make a visit to your optometrist and they will refer you to a specialist if needed!

Hope you learned something new today!

Until next time, Des






2 comments :

  1. What a great summary of orthokeratology! So many patients don't even know this option exists and undergo surgery before exploring all their options for vision correction. We offer sleepSEE overnight vision correction in our office from an OD who is FIAO and Wave certified, so if you ever have any questions, feel free to shoot them our way!

    www.sleepSEE.com

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  2. I'd also like to point out that orthokeratology lenses are FDA Approved for wear at night and that they are proven to slow down (and sometimes, stop completely) the progression of myopia in children!

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